Other

Tarte Tatin


Peeled and chopped apples are cut into thick slices. Sprinkle with lemon juice, then powder with cinnamon.

We caramelize the sugar over low heat. When it has become liquid and has acquired a golden color, add the butter and mix vigorously, until it is incorporated and we obtain a delicious caramel. Add the apples and mix lightly with a spatula, until all the apple slices have a uniform layer of caramel.

Turn the apples into a tart shape and distribute evenly.

The puff pastry is cut into squares of the right size, then the apples are covered.

Apples can remain in the same bowl in which you caramelized the sugar and put the dough on top. Not necessarily cut into pieces, you can put the whole sheet. I put it in pieces because it was not completely thawed and I could not handle the dough properly. :))

Bake over medium heat until the dough is browned.

After removing the tray from the oven, cover with a suitable plate and then turn the tart over with a firm motion. Leave it like this for a few more minutes, to drain all the caramel.

Serve as desired and serve hot with a portion of ice cream.

If it stays on later, it's delicious and cold. Even without ice cream. :))

Source: here and here. :) I mean, I made a combination of the 2. :))


The Best Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin Recipe

This Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin recipe is a pure pleasure to enjoy during apple season. Despite the scary name it is very easy to make, requires only one pan, simple ingredients and a tiny portion of your day. Enjoy this golden caramelized treat with the fragrant vanilla bean ice cream.

I made many apple tarte tatins before and was happy with the results. Until I discovered a new completely different Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin Recipe. Without the doubt, it became my favorite apple dessert.

I discovered this recipe in a new book of Mimi Thorisson “French Country Cooking.” This is her second book about French cooking. The most calming, charming and elegant cookbook I’ve ever owned. Fast enough it became one of my favorite cookbooks in my collection.

I made many recipes from it from easy to more time consuming, and so far loved almost all. There is one recipe that I’m very grateful for and so glad Mimi included it is Apple Tarte Tatin. Thank you, Mimi, so much for sharing this special recipe.

Despite the fancy French name, this is a very easy dessert to make. By bad luck, this is one of the desserts full of myths on how hard and scary it is to make. It is nothing more than caramelized apples and tart crust. The “hardest” part of this recipe is the tart dough. And even this part you can skip by buying store-bought puff pastry or pie dough. Yet, I encourage you to make a homemade tart dough because it makes a significant difference in taste. Also much cheaper to make your own rather than buy.

For some reason, the tart dough recipe from this book didn’t work out for me, and I changed it to my favorite one. Maybe the quality of ingredients is different. Or maybe I’ve done countless tarts and figured out my best tart dough recipe and use it ever since.

Use only the best seasonal apples for this classic french apple tarte tatin recipe. I always favored the Golden Delicious apples for Tarte Tatin. They give an extra depth of taste and a magnificent smell to it.

Mimi’s method is to caramelize apples along with butter and vanilla bean in one pan. This method eliminates making the dry caramel, which is harder and time-consuming process. You simply arrange all ingredients in a skillet and let bubbling and sizzling do the magic. Meanwhile, let the aroma of apples caramelized in browned butter fill your home.

Only a month ago I discovered this recipe and already made it three times. With all the confidence I can tell you this is a foolproof Apple Tarte Tatin recipe. It is easy to make and requires only ONE skillet. Your tiny effort will be rewarded with a delightful classic French dessert.

I encourage you to conquer this classic french apple pie tatin recipe. Make it once, and you will crave for more every time you finish it.


Related Video

Followed A Cook from LAs suggestions on cooking and apples and puff pastry (DuFour) came out perfect. I wanted a more winter treat, so I added some cinnamon and leftover cranberry sauce to my caramel (did half dark brown and half white sugar) and tossed in a few whole cranberries with the apples. The cranberries provided a nice tartness. Served with barely sweetened whipped cream on the side. Very tasty. So easy and everyone loved it.

Simple and delicious! I used 5 gala apples and cooked on the stove top for 25 min and then the oven for 10 minutes before adding the puff pastry and baking for 13 min. In the end I think it is all about watching for the carmelization you desire on the apples. My guests love it! Impressive quick make again.

Amazeballs! So delicious and so easy! I used 7 granny smiths in my dutch oven and cooked / baked for significantly less time than was indicated. I followed the LA cook & # x27s recommendations (15 & # x27 on the stove, 30 & # x27 in the oven with pastry on the whole time) but next time I would do even less. The apples were a bit too soft, although not apple sauce yet. Maybe 10 & # x27 on the stove and 20-25 & # x27 in the oven?

Two things- 1. The cook from LA is correct. A bit less cooking on the apples and more on the crust. 2. I always use Golden Delicious apples which are not too tart, and most importantly, have the right composition to deliver the correct texture. I have seen recipes that also suggest blending a variety of apples, but prefer a more uniform consitency.

Excellent cooked apples longer in caramel syrup on stove and then with pastry on top directly in oven for 30 min

Made this for Canadian Thanksgiving and it turned out fabulous. Used honey crisp apples, about 9 medium ones. Used a peeled and cored apple half as the button in the middle. Tossed the apples wedges with 2tsp vanilla and zest of a lemon. Used salted butter to coat the 8 inch Le Creset skillet and white sugar (will try brown next time). Caramelization took longer than expected and I never did get the darker hue I wanted. I had the apples on the stove for 25 minutes then popped skillet into the oven for 10 minutes. I then added the cold puff pastry before placing back in the oven for 23 minutes. Turned out perfect! Loved the flavor and the turn out was fine. Will be making this throughout apple season!

An hour of cooking left the apples mushy. I scraped them off to serve on french toast tomorrow.

after reading the many reviews, i made this using granny smith apples, and tossed them with about a teaspoon of vanilla. i also added about 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, and 1/4 tsp of nutmeg to the sugar before adding it to the pan. i used the times as listed, and mine came out perfect. it sat for a few hours before serving, but my oven was hot, so i placed it in the oven for about ten minutes before turning it out onto a plate. that was tricky, probably because of the weight of the cast iron pan! my guests, and i, loved it!

Easy and delicious. How you handle your puff dough makes a big difference. Keep it cold! Not too sweet and lovely to serve. I nearly over caramelized the sugar but added a touch of water to stop it from browning further and all was fine. Let mine cool for 2 hours and reheated briefly to soften the apples before turning out onto a plate. Pastry was crispy. Will make again, very easy.

This recipe is on the right track, but has some major flaws. Not sure how everyone is getting such great results here. The cooking times are much too long. I have made this recipe twice and both time my apples were over cooked to the point of becoming apple sauce, meanwhile my pastry was under cooked and not fully browned. when i invert the tart the tops of the apples stick to the bottom of the pan and i end up scraping them off and placing them back on the tart as best i can. i have a new oven and a dial thermometer to give a more accurate reading of the temperature, so i know my oven temp is not the problem. i came up with a solution. in the first phase, while the butter, sugar, and apples are still on the stove top, i only cook them 15 minutes to get the caramelization started. 20 minutes results in the sugar starting to burn. then, instead of doing 20 min in the oven before covering with the pastry, i place the pastry over the apples before i put it in the oven and bake it only for 30 minutes. this gives the apples 10 minutes less time in the oven and the pastry 10 minutes more time in the oven, resulting in firmer apples that hold together and a more evenly browned pastry.

I use this recipe for either apple or pear. I usually sprinkle slivered almonds in the pan after the butter melts. I usually add a bit of cognac or such after the fruit is in the pan and then let the fruit caramelize slowly as it cooks out the alcohol. I make one or the other version every Thanksgiving or Christmas. Wonderful


PASTE (BREAKED OR LEAVED) 250g of broken (or puffed) dough

For the broken dough
200g of Flour
125g of very cold butter
25g of sugar
4g of salt
1 egg

CARAMEL

160g powdered sugar (2/3)
80g butter (1/3)

APPLES

10 to 12 apples that hold up well (Queen of Puppets, Royal Gala, Jonagold, Elstar, Pink Lady)
20g of salted butter
1 vanilla pod (or 25g natural vanilla sugar)
1/2 lemon juice

FINISH (optional)
100g of blond topping or apple jelly

ACCOMPANIMENT (optional)
Fresh cream or ice cream


PASTE (BREAKED OR LEAVED) 250g of broken (or puffed) dough

For the broken dough
200g of Flour
125g of very cold butter
25g of sugar
4g of salt
1 egg

CARAMEL

160g powdered sugar (2/3)
80g butter (1/3)

APPLES

10 to 12 apples that hold up well (Queen of Puppets, Royal Gala, Jonagold, Elstar, Pink Lady)
20g of salted butter
1 vanilla pod (or 25g natural vanilla sugar)
1/2 lemon juice

FINISH (optional)
100g of blond topping or apple jelly

ACCOMPANIMENT (optional)
Fresh cream or ice cream


The Best Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin Recipe

This Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin recipe is a pure pleasure to enjoy during apple season. Despite the scary name it is very easy to make, requires only one pan, simple ingredients and a tiny portion of your day. Enjoy this golden caramelized treat with the fragrant vanilla bean ice cream.

I made many apple tarte tatins before and was happy with the results. Until I discovered a new completely different Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin Recipe. Without the doubt, it became my favorite apple dessert.

I discovered this recipe in a new book of Mimi Thorisson “French Country Cooking.” This is her second book about French cooking. The most calming, charming and elegant cookbook I’ve ever owned. Fast enough it became one of my favorite cookbooks in my collection.

I made many recipes from it from easy to more time consuming, and so far loved almost all. There is one recipe that I’m very grateful for and so glad Mimi included it is Apple Tarte Tatin. Thank you, Mimi, so much for sharing this special recipe.

Despite the fancy French name, this is a very easy dessert to make. By bad luck, this is one of the desserts full of myths on how hard and scary it is to make. It is nothing more than caramelized apples and tart crust. The “hardest” part of this recipe is the tart dough. And even this part you can skip by buying store-bought puff pastry or pie dough. Yet, I encourage you to make a homemade tart dough because it makes a significant difference in taste. Also much cheaper to make your own rather than buy.

For some reason, the tart dough recipe from this book didn’t work out for me, and I changed it to my favorite one. Maybe the quality of ingredients is different. Or maybe I’ve done countless tarts and figured out my best tart dough recipe and use it ever since.

Use only the best seasonal apples for this classic french apple tarte tatin recipe. I always favored the Golden Delicious apples for Tarte Tatin. They give an extra depth of taste and a magnificent smell to it.

Mimi’s method is to caramelize apples along with butter and vanilla bean in one pan. This method eliminates making the dry caramel, which is harder and time-consuming process. You simply arrange all ingredients in a skillet and let bubbling and sizzling do the magic. Meanwhile, let the aroma of apples caramelized in browned butter fill your home.

Only a month ago I discovered this recipe and already made it three times. With all the confidence I can tell you this is a foolproof Apple Tarte Tatin recipe. It is easy to make and requires only ONE skillet. Your tiny effort will be rewarded with a delightful classic French dessert.

I encourage you to conquer this classic french apple pie tatin recipe. Make it once, and you will crave for more every time you finish it.


The Best Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin Recipe

This Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin recipe is a pure pleasure to enjoy during apple season. Despite the scary name it is very easy to make, requires only one pan, simple ingredients and a tiny portion of your day. Enjoy this golden caramelized treat with the fragrant vanilla bean ice cream.

I made many apple tarte tatins before and was happy with the results. Until I discovered a new completely different Classic French Apple Tarte Tatin Recipe. Without the doubt, it became my favorite apple dessert.

I discovered this recipe in a new book of Mimi Thorisson “French Country Cooking.” This is her second book about French cooking. The most calming, charming and elegant cookbook I’ve ever owned. Fast enough it became one of my favorite cookbooks in my collection.

I made many recipes from it from easy to more time consuming, and so far loved almost all. There is one recipe that I’m very grateful for and so glad Mimi included it is Apple Tarte Tatin. Thank you, Mimi, so much for sharing this special recipe.

Despite the fancy French name, this is a very easy dessert to make. By bad luck, this is one of the desserts full of myths on how hard and scary it is to make. It is nothing more than caramelized apples and tart crust. The “hardest” part of this recipe is the tart dough. And even this part you can skip by buying store-bought puff pastry or pie dough. Yet, I encourage you to make a homemade tart dough because it makes a significant difference in taste. Also much cheaper to make your own rather than buy.

For some reason, the tart dough recipe from this book didn’t work out for me, and I changed it to my favorite one. Maybe the quality of ingredients is different. Or maybe I’ve done countless tarts and figured out my best tart dough recipe and use it ever since.

Use only the best seasonal apples for this classic french apple tarte tatin recipe. I always favored the Golden Delicious apples for Tarte Tatin. They give an extra depth of taste and a magnificent smell to it.

Mimi’s method is to caramelize apples along with butter and vanilla bean in one pan. This method eliminates making the dry caramel, which is harder and time-consuming process. You simply arrange all ingredients in a skillet and let bubbling and sizzling do the magic. Meanwhile, let the aroma of apples caramelized in browned butter fill your home.

Only a month ago I discovered this recipe and already made it three times. With all the confidence I can tell you this is a foolproof Apple Tarte Tatin recipe. It is easy to make and requires only ONE skillet. Your tiny effort will be rewarded with a delightful classic French dessert.

I encourage you to conquer this classic french apple pie tatin recipe. Make it once, and you will crave for more every time you finish it.


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The recipe for Tatin pie

In a salad bowl, mix the flour, salt, sugar and then incorporate the butter cut into small pieces.

Then add l & rsquo & oeliguf and work until it worsens to obtain a smooth p & acircte.

Put the paste in a cling film and let it rest for 30 minutes in the refrigerator.

Roll out the dough in a circle about 30 cm in diameter and keep cool until well used.

For the filling:

Peel the apples, remove the stalks and cut them into quarters. Rub them with half a lemon to prevent them from blackening.

Melt the butter over a low heat in a tart pan or sauté pan (with a removable handle) 25 cm in diameter.

Add the powdered sugar in the rain and mix with a wooden spatula.

Caramelize the caramel on high heat and remove from the heat when the caramel is blond.

Arrange the apple quarters on the caramel while holding them & aggravate the vertical with your fingers. Squeeze them tightly against each other and put two quarters of apples on top of each other.

Cook for 10 minutes on high heat. Insert the quartered apples cooked during cooking so that the quarters remain tight.

Sprinkle with a little ground cinnamon and smooth the surface of the apples.

Allow to cool completely.

Turn the sanded disc over the apples, remove the paper, and tuck in the edges of the mold to the back of the mold.

Gently press the paste on the apples without piercing it and make a small path in the center of the paste.

Let stand 30 min in the cool.

Bake for 30 minutes for 35 minutes, until the dough is well cooked.

Leave to dry, place the dish on the pan and turn the whole thing over.

Make a topping and aggravate the pie according to the instructions on the package and brush it on the apples to make them shiny.


Perfect apple tarte tatin

[Welcome to the second episode of the Deputy Chief Series, a sporadic feature on SK in which I invite cooks I admire over to my small kitchen to teach me & # 8212 and thus, us & # 8212 to make one of their specialties. Spoiler: I & # 8217m the sous! Previously: Making potato vareniki with Kachka & # 8217s Bonnie Frumpkin.]


Almost without fail, the more bafflingly short an ingredient list and the more stunningly delicious the outcome, the more likely it is to rivet me. I don & # 8217t need all recipes to have 5- or 10- or fewer ingredients & # 8212 I fare poorly under arbitrarily restrictive confines & # 8212 but doesn & # 8217t it just blow your mind that you can make the apple tarte tatin above with only apples, sugar, butter, lemon juice, and a sheet of defrosted puffed pastry?

Or, you shouldnt be able to. When made well, this upside-down apple tart looks like snug copper cobblestones on top of a rippling puff of flaky pastry. If you're lucky, the apples will taste like they drank a cup of caramel and then napped in what they couldn't finish. I love it enough that I & # 8217ve written about it twice (!) In eleven years but my efforts were & # 8230 mediocre at best. I mean, just look at them & # 8212 too thin, too sparse, too pale, apples either under- or overcooked, and way too many apples have dissolved long before the cooking time should have been up, despite being & # 8220good baking apples . & # 8221

I & # 8217d begrudgingly resigned myself to a life of tatin mediocrity when I spotted one of the most stunning ones I & # 8217d seen to date on a magazine stand. And I had a feeling I knew who had cooked / styled it & # 8212 my across-the-street neighbor. Her name is Susan Spungen and she & # 8217s a cookbook author and food stylist and whether you realize it or not, you & # 8217ve probably admired her behind-the-scenes handiwork on movies & # 8212 see: that croissant scene in It & # 8217s Complicated, oh and everything Amy Adams and Meryl Streep cooked in Julie & Julia. It was on the latter project that she got very, very good at apple tarte tatins. She explains & # 8220It was a quick shot, but I worked hard to get the right look and technique, so I could make it over and over again, and have it look exactly the same each time, which is essential for a movie scene. & # 8221

I invited myself over and watched her make one in her tiny kitchen, not even breaking a sweat, and it was perfect. I thought it would fill me with the confidence I needed to replicate it at home. But two years later, it had not. So, this fall, I asked her to come to my place this time, I took 200 pictures and almost as many notes. I then made four more without her and all except the one I made with what turned out to be the wrong apples, looked exactly like hers. With this I knew it was time to write what I hope will be the last tarte tatin recipe you & # 8217ll ever need.

Here are a few things I learned from watching a professional, and basically doing five tatins in two weeks:

1. The type of apple matters. You need one that holds its shape after it bakes. The internet is full of lists of & # 8220good baking apples & # 8221 and & # 8220bad & # 8221 baking apples and I can't tell you which one will never lead you astray because there & # 8217s (believe it or not) a limit to my madness and I won't be testing any recipe with every variety of apple. However, I was crazy enough to audition four here. I homed in on ones that I can buy at both grocery stores and local greenmarkets right now: Pink Lady, Fuji, Gala, and Granny Smiths. The first three worked great the last one fell to mush. It may be because it was from a grocery store (I actually don & # 8217t find them at markets much) where they & # 8217re often very, very old, or maybe it & # 8217s just that they & # 8217re all wrong for this recipe. I don't think it's worth the risk to find out. If you make it with another kind with success, shout it out (and whether it procured locally or from a grocery store) in the comments.

2. You don't need to cut them all crazy. I see recipes that call for halves (too big), quarters (too small), and some that call for thirds, which is about right but there & # 8217s no need to do exacting knife work to get every piece to be the same size, even if you have the patience to make finicky apple cuts. I & # 8217m using three sizes & # 8212 a little less than half, a third, and about one-quarter in each that you see here & # 8212 and cut them the way you would if you were snacking on an apple: imperfect and easy . A mix of sizes and shapes fits better.

3. Apples shrink a lot when they cook. If you & # 8217ve ever wondered why so many apples are called for in a 9- to 10-inch round tart, this is why. If you & # 8217ve ever made one and really thought you crammed the fruit in, only to have a tatin that looked like sparse apple cobble stones, ditto. It means that when you nestle the apples against each other before you bake it, you want each to lean onto the one behind it, overlapping it by one-third, so as it shrinks in the oven, they & # 8217re still tightly snugged together.

4. Three-quarters of the apple-cooking is done on the stove in the caramel the rest happens in the oven. When the pastry is nicely browned and crisp, it & # 8217s done. This means that if the sautéed apples aren & # 8217t mostly cooked, that they & # 8217re still crunchy inside, it needs more time on the stove before it goes in the oven or the baked tatin won & # 8217t have perfectly tender apples.

5. Because of # 3 and # 4, you really want to use two pans to make your tatin. Trust me & # 8212 a person who will go to almost any length not to dirty two dishes when she could only dirty one & # 8212 when I say that this is a place where it is unequivocally worth it. Almost every apple tarte tatin recipe makes life unnecessarily difficult by having you do the stovetop component (making the caramel and cooking the apples in it) in the same small pan as you & # 8217d might bake your final tart. Just look how many apples end up in the final tart, and that & # 8217s after they & # 8217ve shrunk. It & # 8217s very hard to cook the not-yet-shrunk apples evenly in caramel in a small pan. It & # 8217s is much easier and will give you more consistent results if you use a big skillet. Then, arrange the apples exactly the way you want them in a smaller ovenproof skillet or standard pie pan. (And, it cools the apple mixture down a bit, essential because you don't want to melt the butter in your pastry before it gets in the oven.)

6. Almost every apple tarte tatin recipe, including my previous ones, tells you to flip it out of the pan too soon. Give it time for the caramel and cooked apple juices to thicken up a bit. I found a minimum of 30 minutes and up to 60 worked well. It & # 8217s not ruined if you flip it sooner, but the caramel will be thinner and more likely to run off and puddle.


Related Video

Followed A Cook from LAs suggestions on cooking and apples and puff pastry (DuFour) came out perfect. I wanted a more winter treat, so I added some cinnamon and leftover cranberry sauce to my caramel (did half dark brown and half white sugar) and tossed in a few whole cranberries with the apples. The cranberries provided a nice tartness. Served with barely sweetened whipped cream on the side. Very tasty. So easy and everyone loved it.

Simple and delicious! I used 5 gala apples and cooked on the stove top for 25 min and then the oven for 10 minutes before adding the puff pastry and baking for 13 min. In the end I think it is all about watching for the carmelization you desire on the apples. My guests love it! Impressive quick make again.

Amazeballs! So delicious and so easy! I used 7 granny smiths in my dutch oven and cooked / baked for significantly less time than was indicated. I followed the LA cook & # x27s recommendations (15 & # x27 on the stove, 30 & # x27 in the oven with pastry on the whole time) but next time I would do even less. The apples were a bit too soft, although not apple sauce yet. Maybe 10 & # x27 on the stove and 20-25 & # x27 in the oven?

Two things- 1. The cook from LA is correct. A bit less cooking on the apples and more on the crust. 2. I always use Golden Delicious apples which are not too tart, and most importantly, have the right composition to deliver the correct texture. I have seen recipes that also suggest blending a variety of apples, but prefer a more uniform consitency.

Excellent cooked apples longer in caramel syrup on stove and then with pastry on top directly in oven for 30 min

Made this for Canadian Thanksgiving and it turned out fabulous. Used honey crisp apples, about 9 medium ones. Used a peeled and cored apple half as the button in the middle. Tossed the apples wedges with 2tsp vanilla and zest of a lemon. Used salted butter to coat the 8 inch Le Creset skillet and white sugar (will try brown next time). Caramelization took longer than expected and I never did get the darker hue I wanted. I had the apples on the stove for 25 minutes then popped skillet into the oven for 10 minutes. I then added the cold puff pastry before placing back in the oven for 23 minutes. Turned out perfect! Loved the flavor and the turn out was fine. Will be making this throughout apple season!

An hour of cooking left the apples mushy. I scraped them off to serve on french toast tomorrow.

after reading the many reviews, i made this using granny smith apples, and tossed them with about a teaspoon of vanilla. i also added about 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, and 1/4 tsp of nutmeg to the sugar before adding it to the pan. i used the times as listed, and mine came out perfect. it sat for a few hours before serving, but my oven was hot, so i placed it in the oven for about ten minutes before turning it out onto a plate. that was tricky, probably because of the weight of the cast iron pan! my guests, and i, loved it!

Easy and delicious. How you handle your puff dough makes a big difference. Keep it cold! Not too sweet and lovely to serve. I nearly over caramelized the sugar but added a touch of water to stop it from browning further and all was fine. Let mine cool for 2 hours and reheated briefly to soften the apples before turning out onto a plate. Pastry was crispy. Will make again, very easy.

This recipe is on the right track, but has some major flaws. Not sure how everyone is getting such great results here. The cooking times are much too long. I have made this recipe twice and both time my apples were over cooked to the point of becoming apple sauce, meanwhile my pastry was under cooked and not fully browned. when i invert the tart the tops of the apples stick to the bottom of the pan and i end up scraping them off and placing them back on the tart as best i can. i have a new oven and a dial thermometer to give a more accurate reading of the temperature, so i know my oven temp is not the problem. i came up with a solution. in the first phase, while the butter, sugar, and apples are still on the stove top, i only cook them 15 minutes to get the caramelization started. 20 minutes results in the sugar starting to burn. then, instead of doing 20 min in the oven before covering with the pastry, i place the pastry over the apples before i put it in the oven and bake it only for 30 minutes. this gives the apples 10 minutes less time in the oven and the pastry 10 minutes more time in the oven, resulting in firmer apples that hold together and a more evenly browned pastry.

I use this recipe for either apple or pear. I usually sprinkle slivered almonds in the pan after the butter melts. I usually add a bit of cognac or such after the fruit is in the pan and then let the fruit caramelize slowly as it cooks out the alcohol. I make one or the other version every Thanksgiving or Christmas. Wonderful